Comments

Margaret
12/06/2013 4:53am

Kristi..my daughter, Marie, was just 10 when we got that awful diagnosis. You are so right, diabetes is a family disease. Everyone must get involved in the care of the member who actually has it.

Marie is now 53 years old. We all as a family worked very hard to allow her to live a normal childhood. Nothing that Marie wanted to do or participate in was denied her. Her sister,a year younger, was a constant companion watching for the signs that her sister was in need.

Of course in the early years (1970's) there was no such thing as blood testing at home. We relied on urine tests. It was a challange at times but we all pitched in to keep Marie as healthy as possible.
After collage, and a degree in nursing she worked for several years. In !988, she got an insulin pump, took a 3 month leave from work, and joined a small group for a 3 month cross country bicycle trip. The pump and frequent blood testing made it possible. Today she is The Clinical Supervisor at a hospital and always the one called on to answer all the questions about diabetes management of patients.

I am so proud of her achievements and the way she has managed her diabetes and live life to the fullest despite this challange that is a part of her everyday.

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Nancy Postiglione
12/07/2013 5:30am

Just having one if those pity days. It made me happy to read how well Marie is doing at age 53 and being a TID for so long! My son is 25 and was Dx in September of 1998. I worry all the time about his quality if life as he gets older. He was always so good at testing and calculating pump boluses when he was younger!! As they get older things slide. He always takes his insulin, but doesn't test as much as I'd like.
It's hard to let go as a parent, but he is an adult and knows what he should do. I've always had the haunting question as to WHY it was him?? What did I do wrong? Was it the vitamin I skipped a few times when I was pregnant? Was it a cold he caught because he was in daycare bc I had to work?? No one on either side of our family was a TID and nobody since he was Dx. Sigh..we always told him there would be a cure..I feel like its a broken promise. He has decided that he will not have children. Knowing he could possibly pass this on, is not something he could do to another person. As his mom, that's sad.
I continue to walk, and fundraise so a cure will be found!

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    WRITER: Kristie Perry

    About Kristie;

    I am so fortunate to be the parent of three beautiful children and a wife of nearly 16 years!  In 2010, my young  
    daughter was diagnosed as a Type 1 Diabetic.  I hope you will be blessed and encouraged
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    DID YOU KNOW?
     
    26 million Americans have Diabetes  and most are Type 2.  About 3 million of those are Type 1.    
    Millions  go undiagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes plus millions are  pre-diabetic.  Those with Diabetes face complications that can  lead to death.

    Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes are different but have common
    factors that relate to blood sugar so often we can use the same tools.  


    www.diabetes.org for more info from American Diabetes Association


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